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is to understand the circumstances that are going on right now in terms of the compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's mind of around the idea of america for sale, i like to start at this way. we currently have page 24 of the book and document we have got about a 65.5 trillion what the t negative net worth. now what that means, that is according to the department treasury's own statistics. once a year the deeper and the treasury does a gap accounting and david walker, who was the head of the government accountability office actually resigned in 2008 it went on the week up to our alarming people, telling people essentially that i
that the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked. >> president obama is in asia threw next week with stops in tokyo, singapore, shanghai, beijing. so who get as the lion's share of obama's time? china. three days out of nine replicating what happened recently at the u.n. where the president of china and president obama were closeted for 90 minutes. this time allocation speaks for itself. and if there is any doubt remaining, obama's description of the u.s./chinese relationship clears it up. >> the relationship between the united states and china will shape the 21st century, which makes it as important bilateral relationship in the world. >> question. what must president obama accomplish in china this coming week? pat? >> he'll have to rebalance the trade relationship between the united states and china. the last ten years, the chinese have had a $2 trillion surplus. we've experted to them jobs, factories, money, technology, and that's one of the reasons why we've got this financial crisis and the dollar's in such trouble. what he's got to do is convince the chinese that this
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
of the pope. the religion spread to russia, greece, eastern europe and more recently to the united states. today orthodoxy remains one of the most popular form of christianity. his all holiness was born in 1940 on the turkish island of'm bruce. his father was a barbershop owner. he enrolled in a theological school graduating with high honors in 1961. on october 22, 1991, he was elected the 270th archbishop of constantinople. he was enthroned in the patriarchal cathedral in istanbul. from the beginning he has been on a mission to modernize the church and make it more relevant. early on, he became identified with environmentalism by incorporating yet into his spiritual message, he has preached in the spirit of dialogue and understanding among all religions. while there are chrez yas cal differences with the catholic church, he has met with the pope several times. he had several meets with john paul in the 1990s and met with benedict in turkey. he's met with leaders around the world, including fidel castro and moammar qaddafi. his holeryness is well known in america having received the congr
>>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show wan exclusive interview with maziar bahari "the newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he's written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new deli where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmolian singh. let's get started. everyone has forgotten you, those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confine in the an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek" he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to $300,000 american dollars. he flew back to his home in london just days before his wife paola ga
square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show with an exclusive interview with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he has written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new delhi where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmohan singh. in his only television interview on his trip to washington, d.c. let's get started. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> everyone has forgotten you. those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confinement in an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek." he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to 300,000 american d
karzai can become the effective leader that the united states hopes for and needs in afghanistan. can he rid the country of corruption? can he raise an army capable one day of taking over from the unitedtates? these are all key questions as president obama plans the next phase of u.s. involvement in afghanistan. in our lead focus, the afghan election and beyond. we start in kabul with jonah hull of al jazeera english who found that the issue of fraud remains an undercurrent. >> reporter: just a day after dr. abdullah's withdrawal from the race, hamid karzai is declared winner of afghanistan's presidential election. >> translator: we declare mr. hamid karzai, who got the majority votes in the first round, and who is the only candidate in the second round, be declared president of afghanistan. >> repter: the chairman of the country's top electoral body, the independent election commission, said consensus had be reached among his commissioners baseon the law and in the interests of the afghan people. international reaction was led by united nations secretary ban ki-moon in kabul on an unann
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
in this new media. when somebody stands up in the congress of the united states during the state of the union and said, " ." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did -- "you lie." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did. the civility is not news. we try not to bash the media, hillary. we had an earlier conversation that talk about immigration reform where a truly bipartisan group of senators get together and all slated then, not quite, but there were in large number of democratic and republican senators working on it. that was in 2007. john mccain was simultaneously running for president. he and senator kennedy were the two leaders, the co-authors of the bill. you never saw them together in public however. kennedy said to mccain, look, we cannot show up in tv cameras together or you will lose new hampshire. it is how the press promotes incivility. >> the sense of being in the political minority, the only way you get hurt is to be no easier and more obnoxious. clearly, democrats, we did that -- we talked a lot about this during george bush's presidency. now republicans are doing a t
conference with president obama. let's listen in. >> the deep bonds between the people of the united states and india and a historic opportunity we have to strengthen the partnership between our nations. india today is a rising and responsible global power. in asia, indian leadership is expanding prosperity and security across the region. and the united states welcomes and encourages india's leadership role in helping to shape the rise of a stable, peaceful and prosperous asia. beyond asia, the world's largest multiethnic democracy is one of the world's fastest growing economies and as a member of the g-2 o india will play a pivotal role in meeting the major challenges we face today. and this includes my top economic priority, creating good jobs with good wages for the the american people. so i believe the relationship between the united states and india will be one of the defining partnerships of the 21st century. and this visit underscores the strengthening of that partnership, which i hope will continue throughout my presidency. that's why i have made it a priority to broaden the coopera
to be friends. >> the united states does not seek to contain china nor does a deeper relationship of china mean a weakening of bilateral alliances. on the contrary. the rietz of a strong prosperous china can be a source of strength for community of nations. >> as parted of his charm offensive before midnight tonight eastern time about an hour, 45 minutes from now the president is scheduled to participate in a town hall style meeting with an audience of mostly young people in the big chinese city of shanghai with the latest on that from shanghai major garrett who is traveling with the president joins us. hey, major, what's the buzz on this town hall? is it expected to be adoring or confrontational? >>> oo it will probably be something in between. they are dickering or fighting over each other in the contours or consent to the town mall. to circumvent the election to control the events being imposed to president obama the white house invited and collected through the u.s. embassy questions through the web site for the past couple weeks. the president will get those unseen in the course of the tow
security interest of the united states. it is urgently needed. the president knows achieving this goal will be difficult, but he also has said that he will not waver in his persistent pursuit of a comprehensive peace in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his administration to the resumption of israeli-palestinian negotiations and the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes the prospects for success. . >> that is why we have been urged the palestinians to expand and improve their security effort, and to take strong and meaningful action. it is what we have an urged the arab states to take steps of normalization with israel. it is what we have urged israel to stop settlement activity. as i said earlier, while they fall short of a full freeze, we believe the steps announced by the prime minister are significant and could have substantial impact on the ground. for the first time ever the israeli government will stop housing approvals and on the construction of housing units. and related infrastructure in west bank settlements. that is positive development. he s
of the united states to take a look at your antitrust exemption. york $8 billion organization has not taken seriously responsibility to the players. a fact of the matter is, if yes, people want to play. they are going to be injured and we know that no matter what kind of helmet you build, no matter what kind of equipment that you have, it is a dangerous sport. people are going to be injured. the only question is, what you going to do -- are you going to pay the injured player and their family for the injuries that they have received and how can you be a multi-billion operation? se profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what does the alumni association have to say to active pro, college and high school players about the importance of early and completely presenting to team physicians any sims that may ha
telling the president of the united states no, i don't even want olympia snowe, i'd want one republican supporting health care bill? >> the truth is -- i'm going to disagree right now. free enterprise does not work particularly well in health care and i will tell you why. the administration rate -- >> we don't have insurance companies competing across state lines 3 >> that's the worst thing you could do. >> are you kidding me? >> yes. i will explain why this is. in my state, everybody under 18 has health care. you cannot be refused by any insurance company, no matter what the reason is. everybody gets charged the same. you cannot charge a sick patient who is older more than 20% more than you can charge a young, healthy patient. that has been going on for 15 years. if you could let people buy insurance across state lines, you are making the texas health commissioner be my health commissioner. do you know what the insurance rate is in in texas? 25%. 22% of children have no health insurance in texas. i do not want health commissioner in texas to have anything to do with my health insurance
states, some people who look at the congress of the united states look at the african-american community and believe that the only people who represent african-americans in the congress of the united states are members of the congressional black caucus. and lo and behold, sometimes people wake up. there are blue dogs, yellow dogs, red dogs, no dogs. that have african-americans and latinos in their district. because a vote is a vote is a vote. my point is that there is an opportunity. and we have to understand the role that public policy plays. and we have to understand the value proposition that intelligent scholars play in helping to design and support that public policy, in a role that people play in promoting and articulating messages and supporting those kinds of public policy changes. we need to have a debate in this country right now. reverend jackson said and i agrow with him, it's time for a second stimulus. but it's time for a similar laws that -- stimulus that creates jobs in urban communities, in areas of high unemployment. it's time that we not beat around the bush and say wh
hopelessly deadlocked, can a new jewish lobby here in the united states shake up the status quo in washington, put its stamp on u.s. policy and rival apac? jeremy ben-ami sits down with me for a face-to-face debate on u.s.-israel policy with a member of the old guard. we begin with jay street. take a look at who addressed its opening national conference. >> mr. ben-ami, friends, i'm delighted to have this chance to say a few words to you tonight. let me congratulate you all on this important gathering. your theme says it all. driving change, securing peace. for too long we have not driven change. the palestinian-israeli conflict goes on into a seventh decade. peace has not been secured. and neither side has security. >> king abdullah of jordan is one of america's key allies, and never before has an arab head of state addressed the national conference of a major jewish lobby. so is the balance of power about to shift? i sat down with jeremy ben-ami, executive director of j street and david harris, the executive director of the ajc, american jewish committee. we did invited aipac to participate
it from europe, you see it from the united states and you see it from asia. tell me what you see. >> well, i see a very different situation. in europe there is no recovery and i think 2010's going to be a mediocre year in europe. same thing in japan. we don't see any recovery. we see resistance to the decline but no recovery. in the united states, things look more promising for the short term. you know, after a very large chop in the economy and particularly in the automobile industry. >> rose: but generally those impressions you just said are about the economy overall. >> yeah, but the economy overall we see slight growth in 2010. but a situation very different from one country to the other. >> rose: at what point in an economic recovery do consumers think about automobiles? >> well, you know, it depends where the consumer is. if he's in china or in brazil or india, he's thinking all the time about automobiles. what's the best opportunity? what's the best deal? and we're seeing these sales booming all the time. you know, no matter what. now, in that time, you have an increase of 5% or 10
will also talk about the growth of islamic radicalism within the united states. all those topics and your calls, starting tomorrow at 7:00. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] . >> here is what is ahead. next, a look at the history of the atomic bomb. then a panel discussion on global security after the fall of the berlin wall. later, a review of the 2008 elections. saturday, a look back at the cuban missile crisis with former kennedy advisers ted sorensen and karaoke secret have war threats been over hyped in the post cold-war world? a university of virginia panel on how the political process has been affected by the internet. and facebook founder chris hughes on how social networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> on this vote, the yeahs are 60, the nays are 39. the motion is agreed to. >> with that vote, the senate moves the health care bill to the floor. starting monday and through december, follow the entire debate, and how the bill would affect access to medical care,
wing, it must have been breathtaking. >> it was the most beautiful room in the united states, they said. it is a gorgeous room. except for the purpose for which it was built, so the people could hear one another. the acoustics were dreadful. for the public, it is amazing how much that we build resembles a real approach. you used marble. you cannot expect the acoustics to be good, and they are not. people would babel away -- babble away. sounds whispered at one end could be heard in another position. >> to help with the sound problems, large red drapes were hung all round the hall. with the house now residing in its own wing, the original north section of the capitol was reconstructed. with both wings now completed, construction had begun on the middle part of the building until tragedy struck in the summer of 1814. the war of 1812 made its way to washington. >> with a very inferior force, they swept the americans assaad and came to washington, seized it, and burned every public building. they burned the capitol, they burned the white house, and they did not burn the one place that they
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
. that is not appropriate for the president of the united states. it is not a defense of fox news, but it is what -- it is not what the relationship is supposed to be. >> that is a disastrous thing for president, a prime minister. >> beyond that, he seems to be one of these people who has achieved everything he has done in life. he comes now ill-equipped to handle people who might be pushing back a little bit. there are people like that in washington. that is the impression i get. he does that to his detriment. >> i am not quite sure -- i think that, first of all, as far as his base goes, attacking fox probably was not a bad idea. i do not disagree with anything you said. let me be clear. i think this is a president who, given his intellectual firepower, given the fact he has athletic prowess, given the fact he was raised to be well- equipped to deal with many of the realities he faces, however, i will say that perhaps we can measure better when we see how health care proceeds. it is very clear that this man has to stand up to people in his own party. i think that will be an indication of whether
is the optimal solution to provide necessary medical treatment to everyone and the united states in a way that controls health care costs. pnhp doesn't, however, take a position on how congress members should vote on the legislation that is currently proceeding for congress. we do provide information to members about whether the legislation is likely to be ctive, and how icompes to a national single payer health care system. we joined the many health care reform advocates across the nation who are disappointed by the health insurance reform legislation that is passing through congress. we, like you, are seriously concerned by the health care environment in the united states. we are saddened by the number of people, our patience, family and friends who are donner and because they cannot receive or for access to health care. we are saddened by the number of people facing bankruptcy or foreclosure of their homes and those who are suffering needlessly because they cannot afford or have access to medical treatment. the anticipated a health care debate this year that would focus on the trees st
hnology is more important than ever in driving the united states economy and also 33 percent saying united states will be the global tech leader and a lot of americans think we will not. why is that? >> there's good reason to be concerned. it's not so much that america's innovation pro west is lagging but that the rest of the world is catching us. the recession has not helped with unemployment at ten percent we have good minds not contributing to the economy and we've seen anybody incorporate america has seen a lot of projects and r and d spending cut back as companies try to trim costs as their top line as shrunk so the survey captures the notion that both in the long-term and short-term there's things to be concerned about. > the first paragraph of the story says by most measures, america remains the world leader in technology achievement. consider the 2009 nobel prize winners of the 13 people honored nine were america's. not bad, right? >> but the nobel is a lagging indicator that people earn that typically at the end of their career for work that took place in many cases years and years pri
of the united states, peace can become a reality. [applause] we can surprise a skeptical world. achieving peace is a great challenge facing israel. at the un in september, i spoke of another great challenge. preventing iran from developing a nuclear weapons capability. the iranian regime tyrannizes its people, sponsors and supplies terrorists and openly pledges to wipe israel off the map. just imagine how much more dangerous this regime would be it had atomic bombs. the responsible members of the international community must unite to prevent this grave threat to the pace of the entire world. i support president obama's continued efforts towards these ends. i appreciate the firm position taken by the leading european governments. we must not succumb to the iranian regime's cutting into its to see. we must stand together to stop tehran from realizing its nuclear ambitions. in addition to achieving peace, and to preventing a nuclear iran, there is a third momentous challenge before us. reducing the world's dependence on oil. this would help cleanse our world after more than a century of industrial
of the united states. finally, i just think it's important to point out someone who remembers working in the white house before the state dinner would happen, it's the entire building is a buzz and it's really a way of sort of literally rolling out the red carpet of the united states to another member of the world community and it's such an important symbolic act. it can't be overstated to show that the united states wants to engage the rest of the world and show the united states respects cultures from around the world and let's not forget the president won by asian americans by a large margin so an important symbol here at home to that community. >> danny, as we wait to see the president and prime minister step out, we know they are behind closed doors and part of the conversation is certainly afghanistan and pakistan. you've got vice president dick cheney coming out critical of the administration saying it was dithering but what about making india a key player in whatever happens in afghanistan regarding the strategy? >> i would have to agree. i think our relationship with india wi
't have enough jails there why do we have any jails empty in the united states at taxpayer expense? maybe that's a whole another issue. why do we have a whole federal prison sitting there? is it because some of these prisoners in california are not federal prisoners? peter: only 200 minimum security prisoners at that facility at this point. and we don't mix state and federal prison population. gretchen: but we will bring terrorists there? on its face it seems weird to me that we wouldn't be able to find some use of this prison, instead of bringing some of the world's worst terrorists there. steve: and we were talking about whoever becomes members of that jury for can a lead sheik mohammed their families could be a target. the people of the surrounding area there in illinois, some of them feel like you bring these guys here then suddenly we will be the focus of jihadi and stuff like that. we don't like that. congressman kirk who is going to join us in 45 minutes wrote this letter to the administration. quote: steve: mark kirk is going to be joining us very promptly to talk about that gitmo
be a good idea to admit the deposed and ailing shah of iran, to the united states for medical treatment. well, two weeks later we found ourselves in the embassy behind a steel door on the second floor of the old chancellor ri, the dearly-beloved henderson high that some of you may remember. and on the other side banging on the, banging on the door were this group of unhappy, unhappy iranians. well, it befell to me to -- having made one of probably the worst decisions of my foreign service career -- to go out from that door, to go out from behind the door and attempt, and i use this word with some trepidation, to negotiate with this, with this crowd to see if there was something we could do. maybe we could get them out or at least delay them because what was very clear to us already was that there was, we were on our own. that if anything was going to be done, we had to do it. we had made calls to the iranian government at the time or at least what passed for the iranian government, something called the provisional government of iran. and it was very clear from that contact that there wa
for afghanistan. >> the united states cannot be engaged in an open-ended commitment. >> his attorney general prosecutes the plot's masterm d mastermind. >> in a courthouse just blocks away from where the twin towers once stood. >> this is a big step in the wrong direction. >>> topics this morning for our headliners. secretary of state hillary clinton and former new york mayor, rudy giuliani. hillary and rudy only on "this week." >>> then -- >> we don't have to continue to go down this controversy road. >> she's back. >>> george will, gwen ifill of pbs. david brooks of "the new york "mother jones." corn from >>> and as always, the sunday funnies. >> before john mccain chose her as his running mate, his campaign spent $50,000 on a background check. when he heard this, john mccain said we should have spent $75,000. >>> and we begin today with the secretary of state hillary clinton. thanks for spending time with us this morning. >> it's a pleasure to talk with you from singapore, george. >> wel and as you're in singapore, you and the president are facing really his toughest decision yet on afg
. in each administration that you work worked, the united states had a difficult time coming up with what phillip zelikow calls a new master script for american fortune policy. if you look at the events, the collapse of the wall and attacks of 9/11, the government did a pretty decent job in the kind of tactical response and cleanup to the immediate after mamath in b situations in terms of unification of germany and germany within nato and after 9/11 in terms of the invasion of afghanistan. where things started to get maybe shaky was in the longer-term plan. in terms of the bush administration 34 did have a doctrine after, a while afternoon 9/11 by the fall of 2002 that seemed to guide things and seemed to be problematic. walter slocombe has discussed how the one strategy the clinton administration did have that was kind of long term led to poor results. eric adelman has made the case that the d.g.p. was a success and guided the administration but as hesitanted at by the questions this morning perhaps part of that focus of that document blinded us to the rise of radical islam and terrorism
are destroying the economy of the united states. this election is going to be interesting to see just tell the public is feeling. host: which races are you watching? caller: it is a foregone conclusion that virginia and creigh deeds ran a terrible campaign. the new york 23rd is traditionally a republican district. it will almost certainly go republican. a democrat has not won since 1850. corzine is a wall streeter. host: you would not bit surprised if corzine loses? the president has been there five times to campaign for him? the >> people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. -- caller: people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. they're not happy with corzine's leadership. host: let's hear from a voter voting in today's new york city mayor's race. who are you going to vote for? caller: thompson. chost: why is that? caller: mayor bloomberg is for the rich. when i went downtown, all the buildings were nothing but luxury buildings. people are getting a rent increase every single year. in one of his commercials, he said that crime is down in new york city. he did not m
by the position on the economy. i want to show you the map. this is the united states if you notice the elevation, the higher the state, the higher the unemployment rate. this is what happened last month, if the state is red, the rate went up last month. if the state is green, it came down a little bit in the last month. michigan has the highest in the country, but it came down a bit last month. nevada is high and it came down last month. look at all of the red. 29 states the rate went up last month. we asked in the cnn polling what do you think of economic conditions today? 82% say the economy is in bad shape and then you asked the follow-up question, politically who is to blame for this? right now 38% blame the republicans, 27% the democrats. in may it was 53% republicans and 21% democrats. so james carville if you're looking at that tep months or so in the obama administration. you see a trend in the polling. you're in charge now so you will get more in the blame. >> who are the 18% that didn't think it was bad. i'm curious about these people. >> you are. >> as you would expect that you get fu
. another one of the controversies here is the aid with the united states. we have an enormous coal. forget the humanitarian reasons. a stable government -- we have an enormous goal. there is the homegrown terrorism that gets sent over to the united states, but they do not like it when we give them aid, and we say there are strings attached to it. >> we had a lot of discussion about that, because this became a very big issue. pakistan, and i do not think most of us in america really understood what is the beef? we are trying to demonstrate a long-term commitment to the development of pakistan, to your energy sector, to your infrastructure, the kinds of things that will provide a greater level of stability for the people of pakistan because their incomes will be rising, in their futures will look better. in the three days that i have been here, we could have raised some things differently. we could have been a little more sensitive to how we are perceived. i have been very clear. "look, if you guys do not want the aid, you do not have to take it. i think is important that we have this relati
-paying jobs in the united states. export promotion would be something we could do without spending money. there may be tax provisions that may encouraging highering sooner are remember than than later, so we're looking at those. it is important to wreck r. recognize that if we keep on adding to the debt, even in the midst of this recovery, that a at some point people could lose confidence in the u.s. economy in a way that could lead to a double-dip recession, so one of the trickiest things that we're doing right now is to, on the one hand, make sure that the recovery is supported, and not withdraw a lot of money either with tax increases or big spending cuts and states, for example, need a lot of support to keep hiring teachers and so forth, and at the same time making sure we're setting up a pathway long term for the reduction. it is about as hard of a play as there is, but it's what we have to do, and whatever jobs, additional jobs legislation comes out with has to fit into that broader framework. >> does it raise the deficit or not? >> we haven't seen that and that's part of the reaso
about climate change. where india and the united states are actually both having a little difficulty taming this issue domestically. we both had serious domestic problems with what we would like to do. >> reporter: and this visit comes just as president obama is completing his strategy on afghanistan and actually india plays a key role in that equation. the united states thinks that the animosity between india and pakistan is actually having a bad effect on the efforts in afghanistan with india more focused, sometimes, on the threat from pakistan than it is on the threat from the taliban. john? >> jill dougherty for us at the white house, thanks so much. >>> in the next hour and a half or next half hour, susan malveaux has a behind the scenes look at what it takes to throw a state dinner. wait until you hear about the guests that come to these dinners and leave with the silv silverware. >> nice and classy there. >>> a critical warning for new moms and dads. the consumer product safety commission is recalling 2.1 million cribs. this is the biggest crib recall in history. they're telli
for president. >> well, here is the big question. do you ever want to be president of the united states? >> that certainly isn't on my radar screen right now. but when you consider some of the ordinary turning into extraordinary events that have happened in my life, i am not one to predict what will happen in a few years. my ambition, if you will, my desire, is to help our country in whatever role that may be. and i cannot predict what that will be, what doors would be opened in the year 2012. >> we were talking, she used the word ambition. if she had said my ambition -- my passion or commitment it would have had a different reaction to people and they pay attention to that. sean: you're really good at what you do. you advise politicians and advise a lot of people in the public arena how to deal with the media. but maybe if she -- one of the things she talks about in the campaign is she couldn't be sarah. if she would have listened to you, and become the little contrived -- does she become a little canned, does she become a little -- >> she became contrived and canned because of what wa
trafficking is actually done out of the prison system in the united states. particularly the california prison system. and he mentioned one prison, pelican bay, in specific. and then i came back, and i found that there are all these cell phones in prisons which enables a group, name live the mexican mafia, to essentially use cell phones to give directives right out of prisons on hits, on territories, on dealers, and i think this is a very serious thing. i've introduced legislation that would make cell phones contraband in federal prisons with possession punishable by up to an additional year in prison. what do you think of this? what are you doing? it is a real problem, mr. attorney general. >> it is a real problem, senator. i had experience with that when i was the united states attorney here in washington, d.c. rapel edmonds was convicted, sent to jail and continued to run his drug enterprise from prison, was convicted again for that. the maintenance of cell phones in prison, i think, is unacceptable and i think we have to find ways in which we conif i skate them. you're right, they ought to
of open candid conversations that lead to decisions being made that will benefit the united states and move us toward goals like more peaceful prosperous outcomes for us and many parts of the world. secondly, i think it is important to underscore that we see the fight against al qaeda and the syndicate of terror in the security interest of the united states. i think that kind of got lost the last eight years with a lot of talk about how it wasn't important to get bin laden, you know, that we were there for some other reason. no. it's critical to get those who attacked us. that is what we are there for and what we are trying to do is to assess the best way forward so that we can go anywhere in the united states and anywhere in the world and say the same thing. you have to understand that we believe this syndicate of terror is a threat, not just to the united states and our friends and allies, but to pakistan, afghanistan and many others. >> let me turn to the issue of china where you and the president head next. the lead of the new york times story out this morning about the preside
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